Tag Archives: Replacement

Automotive Clutch Replacement Tips – Dos and Don’ts

Having spent several years in tech support with a company that sells manual transmissions, I have spoken with many customers that have made clutch installation mistakes that cost them dearly in terms of time, money and frustration. These tips are based on my experience with what is frequently overlooked by a novice that is installing a new clutch. This article is NOT a substitute for a good auto repair manual that is specific to the vehicle you are working on! If any of these tips contradict the information in your service manual, follow the service manual instead.

Tip # 1: Lubrication in all the right places (and none of the wrong places!) – Place a light coat of grease on the pilot tip of the input shaft and on the collar that the release bearing slides on. Wipe a VERY light coat of oil on the input shaft splines to prevent rust. Be careful to NOT get any grease on the flywheel, the clutch disc, or the pressure plate.

Tip # 2: Have the flywheel resurfaced, no matter how good it looks. It only costs a few dollars, and the risk of having to remove the transmission again because of a chattering clutch is not worth the money you might save.

Tip # 3: Replace the pilot bearing or bushing. If you don’t have a special pilot bearing puller tool, some service manuals instruct you to remove the old bearing by packing the cavity behind the bearing with grease and using a wooden dowel or old input shaft to drive the old one out. I have found that instead of grease you can use play dough, silly putty, or even some old bread, with equal or better results and way less mess!

Tip # 4: Don’t force anything! If the transmission won’t slide all the way up to the back of the bellhousing, do not draw the transmission up to the bellhousing by tightening the transmission to bellhousing bolts. I can’t tell you how many broken mounting ears and damaged pilot bearings I have seen! If the transmission will not slide all the way in to the bellhousing, then the clutch disc is misaligned or the input shaft is not going into the pilot bearing because the transmission is at an angle. Try this: Install or reattach the clutch linkage, and then have a helper depress the clutch pedal slightly while you wiggle the transmission around to get it aligned. When the clutch disc is released, it will move so that you can get the transmission aligned with the pilot bearing. I fought with a transmission for an hour one time before I thought of this, and then it took about five seconds once I had a helper step on the clutch pedal!

Before tackling your first clutch replacement, I highly recommend reading the complete procedure in a repair manual or factory service manual. Even if you are a seasoned veteran, it doesn’t hurt to take a look at a service manual if you are replacing a clutch in a vehicle you aren’t familiar with.

Tips to Follow After Your Windshield Replacement

If you are looking for post windshield replacement tips, you are on the right page. Although you can get clear instructions from your technician, reading this article can also help you take care of your windshield. Read on to know more.

How long should you wait after a windshield replacement job?

You need to let the adhesive sit for a while before you use your car again. Based on the temperature, humidity, and type of adhesive, you may need to wait for less or more time. As a general rule, you need to wait for at least 60 minutes. If you use special adhesives, you need to wait a bit longer.

When should you remove the tape?

If you used the tape as part of the replacement job, you may want to let it sit for 24 hours. This way the seal will have enough time to dry and it won’t be affected by rain, dust, dirt or other types of debris. Besides, the tape keeps the windshield in place.

When should you go for a Car Wash?

Typically, car washes use extremely high water pressure to remove grime, bugs, and dirt from vehicles. And these jets may ruin the windshield if it has not dried already. If you need to wash your car within 24 hours, make sure you hand wash it instead. However, rain won’t cause a problem. So, there is no need to worry about driving in a storm.

Take It Easy

The molding and sealant are more vulnerable during the first 24 hours post the repair job. So, you might want to take it easy. You don’t need to shake anything. For instance, you may not want to slam your car door as it may cause a sudden pressure rise inside the car, which may break the windshield.

In the same way, you don’t want to go off-road or drive on rough terrain. It’s even better to leave your car windows a little gapped to allow hot air to get out. The idea is to reduce high pressure inside your car.

Opt for A Different Route

You can choose a different route if you have to drive on rough terrain. Aside from this, if you think your car won’t be safe in your current parking lot, you might want to consider a different parking area and report the damage to the owners of the parking area.

Leave A Window as it is

It’s better to leave a window cracked for a minimum of 8 hours once you have worked on one window. This way you can allow the pressure to escape as the internal pressure increases due to the heat of the sun. You might want to close your vehicle doors gently for the first one to two days.

So, if you have replaced your car windshield, we suggest that you follow these tips. This will ensure your replacement is not ruined. After all, you don’t want your effort and money go down the drain just because of your carelessness.